YOUR EXTRA BEDROOM OR DEN COULD SAVE A LIFE...

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We urgently need temporary foster homes (only 8 -10 weeks) for young cats and kittens we recently rescued from a local, overcrowded and unsafe home. While only a few of these cats initially tested positive for the feline leukemia virus (FeLV), all were exposed by virtue of the cramped and horrific living conditions within the house. We are looking for homes with no other cats.

FeLV is transmitted via an infected cat’s saliva, urine, and feces (e.g., sharing of food/litter boxes or grooming). The virus can suppress a cat’s immune system, making it more susceptible to illnesses, and will most likely shorten a cat's life span. So, even though most of these cats have initially tested negative, we are taking a cautious approach. The plan is to retest all these cats, positives and negatives, over a period of two months while keeping them separate from each other (and other cats).

The cats are gaining weight and are generally healthy (a few are working through some gastric upset). Most are very sweet but they are stressed and not happy. Some are frightened by the activity in the hospital, some are lonely and craving attention, some appear a little shell shocked. What you can offer these cats, who've only known instability, filth and fear, is a temporary refuge in a safe and loving environment while our testing and assessment is completed. A caring foster home could save their lives as stress is very detrimental to a cat with a compromised immune system.

For a period of time, your FeLV foster must start out in his or her own space, after which it's possible he or she can hang out in your home with any species other than another cat. The virus is cat specific, so for instance, a rabbit or a gentle dog would be fine, just not a cat. And because FeLV is a fragile virus, unable to survive long outside a cat's body, there's no need for concern over long-term contamination of your space.

We will cover all medical costs and provide supplies such as litter boxes, food, toys, bedding, etc. if needed. You will need: your own transportation, to be able to bring the cat to Just Cats Veterinary Hospital periodically for follow-up exams, and to monitor the cat’s health and behavior to ensure any potential illnesses are dealt with promptly. We will support you every step of the way and always be available for your questions or concerns! Here is a helpful link if you want to learn more about FeLV.

If you want to help save a life, please click here to fill out our online adoption application and indicate foster. If you have fostered for us before, please send an email to cats@fofct.org. If you would like more information about FeLV, please contact us at cats@fofct.org. Fostering is a wonderful way to make a real difference in the lives of the homeless and forgotten cats in our community.

TWO DAYS LEFT FOR OUR LATEST DRAWING!

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NEW DRAWING: Enter to win 1 of 2 magical gifts that will make your heart purr.

FIRST PLACE PRIZE: One watercolor painting of a beloved feline companion created by famed cat artist Nicole Piar ($285 value)

SECOND PLACE PRIZE: One Spirit Card Deck by Nicole Piar ($28 value)

ENTRY FEE: $10 💵

TO ENTER, CLICK HERE!

FOOD DONATION BOX at Just Cats Veterinary Hospital!

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Our friends at Just Cats Veterinary Hospital have graciously allowed us to have a FOOD DONATION BOX in their lobby (1029 E. Main Street, Stamford, CT). The food will be used for our shelter, foster and community cats. We can accept canned food and UNOPENED bags of dry food. Our preferred canned food is Friskies Pate or Fancy Feast Classic (chicken and turkey varieties, when available).

The donation box is ONLY for food. If you have other items to donate, please send an email to cats@fofct.org and we will arrange a meeting with a volunteer to collect the item(s).

Thank you so much for your support!

A HOME FOR SYDNEY

IMG_0609 - 2020-12-14 at 15-04-53 (1).jpg In January, we told you that Sydney, diagnosed with lymphoma, moved to his hospice foster home. We wanted to share a recent update from his foster mom. He is doing really well. He has gained a little weight and seems happy. He is in a loving home with a front row seat to watch the local wildlife. It makes our hearts very happy!! Thank you to his foster family.

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Please continue reading about a couple of other featured felines by clicking HERE .

ADOPTIONS CONTINUE ... despite

Covid-19 Restrictions


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We are still accepting adoption applications for our cats. Please click here to get an adoption application.

SHELBY'S FOREVER HOME

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Happy Ever After! Shelby was officially adopted!

The generosity of our amazing cat-loving community turned Shelby’s life around, giving him the fairy tale ending he deserved. Shelby was a stray that lost a leg and then severely injured one of his three remaining legs. Without some help, the outlook was very grim. But a good Samaritan brought him to us and money was raised for the expensive surgery to repair his severely dislocated ankle fracture that had healed wrong. The surgery was successful and he finished his rehabilitation in a foster home. After charming his foster family (like he did us!), they decided to keep him. His new name is Charlie. He has a wonderful canine companion in the home. We wish Charlie and his new family all the best!!

LOST CAT? HERE ARE SOME HELPFUL TIPS

Seeing "lost cat" posters on poles and signs is very sad. We try to keep our cats safe, and hope it never happens to us, but sometimes a cat gets outside and becomes "lost." Here is a helpful website with steps to take when you have a lost cat. Click on lost cat to learn more.

JOIN OUR "TNR" TEAM

Want to make a difference in the lives of homeless and forgotten cats in the Stamford community? Consider volunteering on our Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) team.
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TNR is a humane solution to the problem of feline overpopulation. Train side-by-side with our experts. All you need is a love for cats, with a respect for their natures and the people who care for them. To read about our latest TNR success, click on West Side Story.

Email us at cats@fofct.org to volunteer or get more information.

WHY FOF? WHY TRAP-NEUTER-RETURN?

For over 15 years, Friends of Felines (FOF) has been helping homeless, forgotten, abandoned, and feral cats to have better lives. FOF finds loving homes for those cats who are adoptable; especially feral kittens and abandoned pets. FOF also improves the lives of feral cats that are not adoptable by providing spay and neuter services, other medical care, and food as part of colony care-taking. This approach is called Trap, Neuter, Return (TNR).

FOF volunteers have fostered hundreds of cats and enabled their transition to forever homes. Volunteers have trapped feral cats living in harsh or dangerous locations, rescued cats from overcrowding situations, and responded to calls about "found cats" from local community members. And FOF has been a partner with Stamford Animal Control and other pet rescue organizations to help save as many of our feline friends as possible.

"TNR is is a method for attempting to humanely and effectively manage free-roaming domestic cats. The process involves live-trapping the cats, having them spayed or neutered (aka: desexed), ear-tipped for identification and, if possible, vaccinated, then releasing them back into their territory. Ideally, friendly adults and kittens young enough to be easily socialized are retained and placed for adoption."
Source: "Neighborhood Cats TNR Handbook: The Guide to Trap-Neuter-Return for the Feral Cat Caretaker (2nd edition)" by Bryan Kortis (2013)

TNR is supported by the ASPCA, the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), and the American Humane Society. "The ASPCA endorses Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) as the only proven humane and effective method to manage community cat colonies." ("Feral Cats FAQ" ASPCA)

To read more about FOF and TNR click to read our West Side Story.

The Costs of Caring for Homeless & Forgotten Cats

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Rescue is an expensive endeavor. We hope this chart gives you an idea of how your dollars are used. Friends of Felines is an all-volunteer organization. Almost every dollar donated goes directly to the cats to cover these types of expenses.

Your financial support made it possible for us to help almost 250 cats in 2019. Please consider a donation or volunteer with us!

DONATE TO FRIENDS OF FELINES

Do you want to help the homeless and forgotten felines in your community? There are many ways to contribute your time, talent, and dollars. To find out more, click DONATE.

Friends of Felines - Adoptions in Westchester County, New York

Please be aware that we are located in lower Fairfield County, Connecticut and prefer to place our cats close to home. We adopt to families in nearby Westchester County: including the towns of: Bedford, Blind Brook, Byram Hills, Harrison, Katonah-Lewisboro, Mamaroneck, New Rochelle, Pound Ridge, Portchester, Rye, Rye Brook, Scarsdale, and White Plains.

You can email us at cats@fofct.org or go to Contact Us for more information.

Friends of Felines - Adoptions in Fairfield County, Connecticut

Please be aware that we are located in lower Fairfield County, Connecticut and prefer to place our cats close to home. Fairfield County includes the towns of: Bethel, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Danbury, Darien, Easton, Fairfield, Greenwich, Monroe, New Canaan, New Fairfield, Newtown, Norwalk, Redding, Ridgefield, Shelton, Sherman, Stamford, Stratford, Trumbull, Weston, Westport and Wilton.

You can email us at cats@fofct.org or go to Contact Us for more information.

 
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